Hippocrates in a World of Pagans and Christians (Ancient Studies : History of Medicine) by Professor Owsei Temkin
Hippocrates in a World of Pagans and Christians (Ancient Studies : History of Medicine)
Author: Professor Owsei Temkin
Title: Hippocrates in a World of Pagans and Christians (Ancient Studies : History of Medicine)
ISBN10: 0801840902
ISBN13: 978-0801840906
Format: .PDF .EPUB .FB2
Pages:
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press (April 1, 1991)
Language: English
Size pdf: 1674 kb
Size epub: 1601 kb
Rating: 4.8 ✪
Votes: 416
Category: Medical Books
Subcategory: History

"The fascinating story of how Hippocrates and the Oath (which is unlikely to have been written by the great Coan doctor himself) became Christianized is the theme of this wise and humane book... Historians, theologians, and doctors alike will benefit from this clear, learned, and courteous exposition of an enthralling theme."--Vivian Nutton, Times Literary Supplement.

"A feast of citations from a staggering variety of sources... The reader can only salute [Temkin] as one of the greatest humanist physicians of our time."--New England Journal of Medicine.

In Hippocrates in a World of Pagans and Christians, Temkin shows how the perennial appeal of Hippocratic practice helped establish the relationship between scientific medicine and monotheistic religion. After the first century, Hippocratic medicine competed with powerful beliefs in religious healers from Asclepius to Jesus. Yet the ascendance of Christianity, Temkin explains, did not diminish the stature of Hippocratic science. Hippocrates, after all, saw nature as a divine and orderly power that caused growth and supplied "health." Hippocratic doctors could easily exchange the cult of Asclepius for the worship of Christ. But they could not sacrifice their belief in nature as the basis of health, disease, and therapy without renouncing their science. In compromise, the Church accepted Hippocratic medicine with the proviso that the Christian physician shun all pagan or heretical interpretations of naturalism--he must not, for example, believenature to be divine, the soul a mere function of the brain, or himself the true savior of the sick.