Philosophical Psychology: Psychology, Emotions, and Freedom (John Henry Cardinal Newman Lectures) by Craig Steven Titus
Philosophical Psychology: Psychology, Emotions, and Freedom (John Henry Cardinal Newman Lectures)
Author: Craig Steven Titus
Title: Philosophical Psychology: Psychology, Emotions, and Freedom (John Henry Cardinal Newman Lectures)
ISBN10: 0977310361
ISBN13: 978-0977310364
Format: .PDF .EPUB .FB2
Pages:
Publisher: The Catholic University of America Press (October 13, 2009)
Language: English
Size pdf: 1818 kb
Size epub: 1888 kb
Rating: 4.7 ✪
Votes: 440
Category: Other
Subcategory: Humanities

Elizabeth Anscombe, in her critique of modern moral philosophy, called for a renewed "philosophy of psychology." In line with her hopes, Philosophical Psychology outlines a vision that seeks to do justice to the complexity of the human person. As a comprehensive study of the human psyche, a philosophical psychology is established neither by empirical studies nor by clinical psychology nor even by a priori conceptual analysis alone. Through a critical appropriation, however, it involves careful observations and reflections that draw on empirical, clinical, and conceptual endeavors. As a bridge-building discipline, it also connects elements from philosophical and theological anthropology, including the ethical and religious traditions that underlie those reflections. In turn, this philosophy provides a basis for psychological, moral, and social applications that recognize deeper human and spiritual resources.

This interdisciplinary collection of essays features scholars of international reputation in philosophy, psychology, political theory, and religion offering original reflections on human embodiment and emotion, commitment and freedom, reason and moral theory. Kevin L. Flannery examines G. E. M. Anscombe's call for a renewed philosophy of psychology. Benedict Ashley explores how metaphysics serves psychology. Roger Scruton writes on confronting reductionist notions of biology. Ceslas Bernard Bourdin discusses the historical context for understanding religious freedom. Aidan Nichols considers the rapprochement of psychology and theology in the collaboration between Carl Gustav Jung and Victor White. Richard Sorabji examines emotions in the psychotherapy of the ancients, and Daniel Robinson discusses the intelligibility of emotions.


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